April Newsletter |”Log of the Trail”

Meeting Announcement: Our April meeting will be held on Tuesday, April 20, 2010, in the Fiesta Room at the Hallmark Apartments in Alpine from 7:00 – 9:00 pm.

Speaker will be Darrell on the new novel  “Imp Of Woe”.
The assignment for April is Poetry! Old ones or New ones, as long as we haven’t heard them. Up to 3 short ones or one very long one.

From the Atelier of our President:

Yeah, team!  Another successful retreat completed.  Thank you, Reba and Jackie, for co-chairing this event and thank you to your team of workers who helped bring it all together!  I heard many good comments from our guests.  And, I thought our presenters were especially good.  And, they participated in almost all of our activities which was nice.

We’ll sum up and discuss the retreat during our next meeting which will be Tuesday, April 20.

Let’s keep the May 15 Trip to Lubbock date on our calendars.  That’s the target date for the writer’s night with the Lubbock Writer’s group.  And, our meeting in May will be our last meeting until September.  Be thinking about the location for that party/meeting.  I would love to offer my place,  however, my little place is so small when you cuss the cat you get fur in your mouth.

We elect new officers during our May meeting.  It’s time for me to “retire.”  It’s been lovely, but time for new blood.  Be thinking about nominees.

Everybody take a well-deserved rest!  Good job, team!

Donna


Tenth Annual Texas Writers Contest
sponsored by the Haltom City Library

Visit their website for more information!

Download Flyer


WOW-save-the-date$5B1$5D


Braggin’ Rights

From Frank Carden

Frank Carden’s (Las Cruces NM) novel, The Prostitutes of Post Office Street, is a finalist for the Eric Hoffer award for the best book of ’09. It is also a finalist for the Eric Hoffer Montaigne Medal which is awarded for the most thought-provoking book. The novel is about the red-light district of Galveston (’54) where downtrodden, but proud women work, and bent cops hangout.


Minutes from the TMTW March meeting: Download here

Demystifying Writers’ Demons©

One by One –  by Joan Upton Hall

There/ their/ they’re

o there (adverb)
“Wait for me there.” (at that place) OR  “I agree with you there.” (in that matter)
There are three pictures.” (introductory word in inverted sentence)

o their OR  theirs (possessive pronoun for “something belonging to them.”)
“These pictures are theirs.” OR  “These are their pictures.”

o they’re (contraction of “they are”)
They’re going on a cruise.” OR  “Do you think they’re dependable?”

Memory tips: (Look at each word within a word.)
Things are either here or there.
The heirs inherit their wealth.
But if you can substitute “they are,” then you need an apostrophe for the letter that is left out.

Do demons bedevil your writing? Similar, confusing words? Grammar, punctuation, or capitalization rules? “The Demystifier” will clear up the mystery (primary reference unless otherwise noted: Garner, Bryan A. Dictionary of Modern American Usage. N.Y.: Oxford University Press). Address questions and comments to freelance editor, Joan Upton Hall at: moc.l1500726852oa@ll1500726852aHumj1500726852. More problems like the above are demystified in the booklet, 50 Writers’ Tips. Find more at http://www.JoanUptonHall.com/books.htm.


Final Note from the Editor:

Have news? Toot your horn, clang your bell, raise your roof! Tell us your news and stories – or writing news in general, such as publications you would recommend, contests, book events, etc. Send your Braggin’ Rights and Trail Bits to gro.s1500726852retir1500726852wliar1500726852tniat1500726852nuoms1500726852axet@1500726852wtmtk1500726852sa1500726852.

Demystifying Writers’ Demons©
One by One –  by Joan Upton Hall

There/ their/ they’re

o there (adverb)
“Wait for me there.” (at that place) OR  “I agree with you there.” (in that matter)
There are three pictures.” (introductory word in inverted sentence)

o their OR  theirs (possessive pronoun for “something belonging to them.”)
“These pictures are theirs.” OR  “These are their pictures.”

o they’re (contraction of “they are”)
They’re going on a cruise.” OR  “Do you think they’re dependable?”

Memory tips: (Look at each word within a word.)
Things are either here or there.
The heirs inherit their wealth.
But if you can substitute “they are,” then you need an apostrophe for the letter that is left out.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*